All posts filed under: Gospel of Grace

On dating non-Christians and non-gospel affirming Christians 

© April 20, 2018 | Schulter Etyang This question keeps being posed, is it okay to date and eventually get married to a non-Christian? And the default response has always been, “Do not be yoked together with unbelievers.” (2 Corinthians 6:14 NIV) And then one makes the case that they have seen couples where one wasn’t a Christian before they got married and now have a good marriage. Therefore, in their opinion, it is okay to date and marry a non-Christian. The answer to this line of reasoning is usually; “That is the exception and not the rule.” The blowback is always, “I want to be the exception.”

The gospel according to Chapati/Roti #1

© January 16, 2018 | Schulter Etyang Growing up, chapati or roti (as its known here in South Africa) was a favourite meal in my family. My mother made chapati for us on weekends, and on special occasions such as birthdays, Easter and Christmas celebrations. When you saw her gathering the ingredients for making chapati, your heart beat with excitement and your salivary glands did a dance. It wasn’t until after I got married, that I really learnt how to cook chapati. I had assumed that I’d never need to learn how to make chapati until I discovered how much Jenny loved them. Roti’s origins are traced back to the Indian subcontinent. In South Africa, roti is a main delicacy amongst Indians and the colored community. Jenny’s family lives in Durban, which is the epicentre of the Indian community. Indians arrived in South Africa in 1860 to work as slaves at the sugarcane plantations. It is proper to say that their influence has spilled over into many cuisines and dinner tables.

The gospel void in our generation is real

Judges 2:10-11 (NKJV) When all that generation had been gathered to their fathers, another generation arose after them who did not know the Lord nor the work which He had done for Israel. Then the children of Israel did evil in the sight of the Lord, and served the Baals. So, Joshua dies. His generation follows suit. The text seems to suggest that they simply inherited the land and just died. They simply got their inheritance, enjoyed the benefits and just died. A new generation rises. Here’s the indictment against the new generation – they did not know the Lord nor the work which he had done for Israel. This is so evident in our times. My generation does not know Jesus or what he has done for us. There is a huge gospel void in our generation. I meet and see young people who really don’t know who Jesus is and what He did for them. Even if they grew up in church, they rarely heard the gospel being preached. All they heard was …

Read the Bible for yourself! Not so easy as it sounds

After years of listening to gospel and grace preachers the worst advice I’ve heard them give Christians is this – “go read the Bible for yourself”. Grace preachers keep telling their audiences to read the Bible for themselves and not allow “theologians” to misconstrue the Bible. I think this is highly simplistic and misleading. To a degree I kinda get where they are coming from when they advice us to read the Bible for ourselves. It’s because most Christians are ignorant of what is in the Bible. Most Christians simply don’t know what is in the Bible. And even if they do, they don’t have the right skills in terms of properly interpreting the Bible. They do not know how to study the Bible.

What’s your worth?

    © April, 25 | Schulter Etyang There is this fascinating account in Leviticus 27 about how the priest would place a determinate value on people, animals, houses, and fields. The whole chapter describes how the valuation process took place. If it were a man 20-60 years old, their value would be 50 shekels of silver. If it were a woman of the same age, it would be 30 shekels (Vs. 3 -4) For the male 5-20 years old, their value would be 20 shekels. For the female of the same age it would be 10 shekels (Vs. 5) If the baby were male, then his value would be 5 shekels. If she were a girl, her value would be 3 shekels. (Vs.6) For the male 60 years old and above, their value would be 15 shekels. For a female of the same age, it would be 10 shekels. (Vs.7)

Worship leader, here’s why lifting our hands in surrender is not a New Covenant doctrine

© April 11, 2017 | Schulter Etyang For many years as a worship leader, I encouraged people during worship to lift their hands as a sign of surrender. During worship, I made it a priority to make sure that there will be a session where the whole church would lift up their hands. I actually loved the sight of it. Seeing lifted hands in worship is a sight to behold. It really is. I think the significance of that action is tremendous because we are doing it to our God. Nevertheless, I made the church lift up their hands because I had been taught that the lifting of our hands is a sign of surrender. As you may know, we lead as we are led. We really actually parrot what we have been taught. This is one area where I just repeated what I had heard from prominent worship leaders of that time.